English Language Institutions

Dublin is a very popular place to learn English. The locals – who are clearly biased but not necessarily wrong – believe that they speak English better than anyone else does (including the English). Every type of course is on offer and many college options are available: it’s a good idea to spend some time working out which one is best for you. Long-established and internationally affiliated schools include Berlitz and Kaplan. Highly reputable third-level (tertiary) educational i

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Bank Accounts and Tax

Your guide to setting up a bank account and becoming a tax payer in Ireland. You’ll need an Irish bank account to receive your pay. It isn’t difficult, but you will have to be in the country to do it – most Irish banks will want to speak to you in person before they open an account for you.

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Immigration Requirements

The legal requirements for living and working in Ireland differ for people from different countries. EU, European Economic Area (EEA) and Swiss citizens are entitled to move to the Republic of Ireland and work here without a visa or employment permit. People from further afield may need a visa and will require an employment permit before they can take up work. Because Northern Ireland is part of the UK, the UK’s withdrawal from the EU (‘Brexit’) would make the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland an external border of the European Union. However, the Irish and UK governments and the President of the European Council have stated that t

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Brexit

According to a European-wide analysis of FDI trends published in June 2019, Ireland delivered a “Brexit-busting performance” in attracting foreign direct investment in 2018, winning 52% more FDI commitments than in the previous year. Other factors crucial to Ireland’s strong performance include its economic and political stability, in addition to its continued commitment to the EU. In combination, all these factors serve to increase Dublin’s attractiveness to foreign investors post-Brexit. For companies seeking to deal with the impli

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Life Sciences

Ireland is a global centre for life sciences. Pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical devices and diagnostics are all areas in which significant investments in operations have been made on a country-wide basis. Ireland is one of the top global exporters of medicinal and pharmaceutical products. All of the top ten global pharmaceutical companies, nine of the top 10 medtech companies and seven of the top ten diagnostics companies have bases in Ireland. Numbers of Irish-owned companies in the sector have also grown significantly. Companies are attracted by Ireland’s favourable tax environment, international reputation in regulatory compliance and track record in clinical and

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Financial Services

Dublin is a major global hub for fund administration, aircraft leasing, insurance and a range of wholesale banking activities. Ireland is the 4th largest provider of wholesale financial services in the EU. It is a base for a wide variety of financial firms which are attracted by robust regulation and a strong skills base as well as excellent investment and tax incentives. A combination of 12.5% tax and an exceptionally extensive and comprehensive set of double tax agreements with 62 countries makes Ireland a highly tax- efficient location. Such efficiency is particularly beneficial for international financial service operations. More information can be found from

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Tech

High-quality tech and multilingual talent is readily available in Dublin. Add to this a rich tech startup ecosystem, 9 out of the top 10 global tech companies, a supportive business ecosystem including technology and research centres and an excellent quality of life and it’s easy to see how Dublin provides the perfect base to thrive. Why Ireland for Tech: 8 of the top ten Global software Companies 9 of the top ten US Technology Companies Top 3 Global Enterprise Software Companies 4 of the top 5 IT Services Companies

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Logistics and Storage

As an export-driven economy on the periphery of Europe and the home of the European or EMEA headquarters for many global players, the transport and logistics sector is a significant and growing sector in Dublin. As the economy continues to grow and the shift to online retail continues, logistics and storage is expected to be the fastest growing employment sector in Dublin over the coming decade. This will be driven by demand for both passenger and freight transport and associated activities, including storage and courier services. The sector currently accounts for about 5.5% of total employment. Trends are predicted to spur demand for business managers, drivers, plant operators and

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Professional Services

Professional services such as law, accounting, R&D, marketing and management consulting are well represented in Dublin. The sector accounts for 8.5% of total employment in Ireland and positive trends in its growth are expected to continue. In particular, demand for research and development, advertising, real estate, legal, finance and marketing services is forecast to show significant growth. Dublin is considered a centre of excellence for business services and there is a substantial and growing global business services sector in the city. Many leading global players

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How to start a business

Not only does Ireland’s unique strategic location make it the perfect gateway to Europe and the US, it has also been ranked the best country in Europe for startups by smallbusinessprices.co.uk. In Dublin, you will have access to a young, diverse, highly educated and highly skilled workforce, both Irish and International, who enjoy a great quality of life. Dublin is particularly well set-up for start-up businesses, with many supports both financial and non-financial in place, especially for those introducing a new or innovative product or service to international markets.

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Accelerators & incubators

Give your start-up a head-start with accelerators and incubators Dublin is acknowledged as being home to some of the best accelerator and incubator programmes in Europe. These enable entrepreneurs to meet with like-minded people and provide the structure, skills, investment and support they need to prove, launch and scale-up their businesses. Accelerator programmes give developing companies access to industry-specific mentors, potential investors and other supports that will help them to build their start-up. One of Dublin’s most well-known accelerators is NDRC, based in the Liberties area of the city.

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Startup Ecosystem

Dublin’s start-up ecosystem has a reputation for being diverse, welcoming and accessible. Whether you’re looking for funding and investment, supports or just to connect with like-minded startups – as well as more experienced entrepreneurs – we’ve got you covered. Local Enterprise Offices (LEO) The LEO network is the first stop for anyone seeking information and support for starting a business in Dublin. There are four dedicated LEO teams, one based in each of the region’s four local authority areas: Dublin City, 

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Coworking & Enterprise Centres

Coworking has really taken off in Dublin, establishing a new kind of workspace for start-ups. You’re not just a tenant in a coworking space. Instead, you’re a member of a collective, an active component of a community comprising like-minded creators, innovators and entrepreneurs. Coworking spaces tend to be in cool, contemporary, aesthetically pleasing buildings. But it’s their relative affordability that makes them so attractive – with a desk space in a fully serviced, centrally located building from only two or three hundred euro a month, and some offering pay-as-you-go and hourly pricing plans.

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Commercial space

Whether you’re looking for a 55m² retail unit or a 12,000m² office space, Dublin has the right spot for your business and one that will fit your corporate culture. From new-builds to conversions of characterful historic properties, and from bijou to very big, the perfect base for your start-up – or your international corporation – is here. Available locations include city-centre high-rises in the city’s Central Business District (CBD) and leafy suburban office parks. Thanks to on-going development, Dublin’s property inventory is growing rapidly. According to Property consultants CBRE, ’30 office schemes were under construction in Dublin city centre at

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Funding & Supports

State Funding & Supports There is an extensive range of state supports available to companies choosing to base themselves in Dublin. Foreign direct investment For both established and emerging multinationals, the highly successful and long-established semi-state agency IDA provides a comprehensive range of services to overseas companies who are looking to establish or expand their operations in Dublin. From arranging introductions within government and industry to providing grants and other investment incentives, the IDA is your 

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Legal matters & permits

The World Bank’s Ease of Doing Business report ranks Ireland as the world’s 8th easiest place to start a business: “Ireland’s pro-business attitude and relatively low level of bureaucracy supports the setting up of business with a minimum of red tape…[its] strong legal and regulatory landscape makes the country an attractive and stable place to do business”. Regulation Irish regulators, across different sectors, have a strong reputation for excellence. These include the Central Bank of Ireland which is the regulator of all Financial services firms in Ireland, the Health Products Regulatory Authority (HPRA) which boasts a

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Access to talent

An exceptional workforce Ireland ranks first in the world for productivity in Industry and first for flexibility and adaptability, according to the 2018 IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook. These rankings are due in part to the multinational companies currently operating in Dublin and their employees – who number in excess of 90,000. Ireland has the youngest population in Europe. A third of the population is under 25 years old and almost a half under the age of 34. It’s not just the sheer number of potential workers that’s impressive, but their e

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Business ecosystem

Ireland’s capital has a thriving, vibrant and diverse business ecosystem which always has room for entrepreneurial business people.

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Connectivity

Dublin is Ireland’s capital city and is closely connected to the rest of the island by road and rail. Its air, sea and digital links also guarantee excellent connectivity with the UK, Europe and the rest of the world. Digital Connectivity Dublin benefits from one of Europe’s most advanced and competitive telecommunications infrastructures. An extensive fibre optic network provides world-class national and international connectivity. The Irish telecommunications market is fully deregulated and a number of companies operate within it, including Eir, ESB telecoms, and Virgin Media. Mobile networks in Dublin A mixture of 3G and 4G mobile networks are availa

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Global players

Since the 1950s, Ireland has pursued a vision of ‘industrialisation by invitation’ by creating a welcoming business environment. The country’s strong legal and regulatory landscape also contributes to its reputation as an attractive and stable place to do business. EU and Eurozone membership, a young, well-educated, English-speaking workforce and a competitive corporate tax rate have enticed thousands of international companies to set-up shop here. According to the IDA, one-third of MNCs in Ireland have had operations here for over 20 years, a clear demo

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Move your business

Dublin is a favoured base for many international businesses and is home to the European headquarters of many more. Find out what’s placed this compact city among the top choices in the world – and see if your business is ready to set up its home here.

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Starting a business

Dublin has a reputation internationally for being a start-up-friendly city. The small size of the city and its open, welcoming attitude provides both international and Irish entrepreneurs with easy access to relevant decision makers and a very supportive and connected start-up ecosystem. No wonder then that, with a low level of corporate tax and minimum red tape, the World Bank ranks Ireland in the top 10 countries worldwide (2018), to start a business.

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Key sectors

Dublin has a vibrant and diverse economy. It supports thriving clusters of both Irish and international players and is experiencing strong growth in employment across a wide range of industry sectors. This success is expected to continue; FDI Intelligence has ranked Dublin as No. 1 in terms of economic potential among large cities. Dublin’s exceptionally well-educated, English-speaking workers, its business-friendly tax infrastructure and its strong ties to both the EU and US make this city the ideal place to expand or invest.

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Investment opportunities

Two very popular areas to invest in here are Dublin’s startups – and emerging companies – and its real estate. Dublin’s startups and emerging companies Whatever your interests, budget and appetite for risk, Dublin’s capital ecosystem can provide the investment opportunity you’re looking for. Tech Ireland’s website is a good place to start your search. If you are interested in meeting some of Dublin’s entrepreneurs, visit Startup Dublin, which arranges startup networking events – including the highly s

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The Dublin Economic Monitor

The Dublin Economic Monitor reports on economic trends emerging in the capital and provides a comprehensive picture of how the Dublin economy is performing. The Monitor publishes new data each quarter to help the reader process and understand economic performance. It provides a dashboard of the most relevant economic indicators for Dublin on business and consumer sentiment, employment trends, passenger and freight information, and property trends. It also provides unique insights into domestic and tourist spending in Dublin.

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Getting to college

Dublin is a compact and highly walkable city which is also well served with public transport. A number of its colleges and universities, including Trinity College (TCD), NCAD and The Royal College of Surgeons (RCSI) are located in the heart of the city centre. Others, like UCD, DCU and DIT are situated nearby. Maynooth is in itself a university town. Here’s a rundown of how to get to them. City centre universities & colleges Trinity College Dublin (TCD) TCD is located in central Dublin. Its campus is serviced by a full range of public transport, including mainline railway

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Cost of living for students

There’s no way around it, Dublin is expensive. But with a bit of savvy budgeting, it is affordable. Here’s an overview of what it might cost you to live here.

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Arrival Guide

Your first days in a new city can shape your overall experience. With that in mind, here’s a short checklist of things to do shortly after you arrive. Ticking them off will help you have a fun and hassle-free time in your new city.

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Tuition Fees

Dublin is a great place to study and its universities welcome students from across the world. But how much will your studies cost? Most universities and institutions of higher learning have at least two parts to their fee structure – tuition and the student contribution. Tuition covers your learning in class, while the student contribution covers student services and examinations. The maximum rate for the student contribution in 2018–2019 is €3,000. Fees are competitive, particularly when compared to those of universities in the UK, which are on average more than three times more expensive. In addition, many EU students may not have to pay any fees – please see below.

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Colleges

Dublin’s universities aren’t the only prestigious educational institutions in the capital. The city is also home to a number of colleges with long histories and international reputations. Amongst them are the Royal College of Surgeons (RCSI) with its enviable location on beautiful Stephen’s Green; the country’s oldest art college, NCAD, located in the inner city area known as ‘The Liberties’; and many more: Church of Ireland College of Education (CICE) The Church of Ireland College of Education trains primary school teachers, particularly for schools under Church of Ireland, Me

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Private colleges

In addition to Dublin’s publicly funded colleges, there are a number of private institutions which also provide higher level education. Dublin is also a popular choice for students who want to learn English; Ireland as a whole hosted almost 125,000 English-language students in 2016. College of Computing Technology (CCT) The College of Computing Technology offers students a wide range of courses. These are career-based and updated each year in line with changes and technological advances within the industry. Its campus is located in Dublin city centre. CCT is attended

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Universities

Approximately 120,000 students in total attend the Dublin region’s five universities. The oldest, Trinity, is in the heart of the city. Four of the others have campuses in the suburbs and one is located in the town of Maynooth, about 25km from the city centre. While each have their particular strengths, between them they offer courses in everything from astrophysics to zoology. Business, tech, law and the humanities are all popular choices. The Irish Universities website has more facts. Trini

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Why study in Dublin?

Ireland is internationally recognized for its impressive standards of education. Its capital city – which is also the English-speaking capital of the Eurozone – is fast emerging as a prominent education hub for overseas students. Diploma, master’s and PhD courses are all available at Dublin’s leading universities, colleges and educational institutions. Its ‘high educational level’ is one of the top three ‘attractiveness factors for [Dublin’s] economy’ and a major contri

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Where you can study

Dublin’s higher-education offering is amongst the best in Europe. The city’s heritage as a place of learning stretches back to the 16th century; since then Dublin’s students and teachers have pioneered advances in disciplines as diverse as medicine, atomic physics and literature. More recently the city’s educators have also excelled in the area of business, technology and digital innovation. Top Universities includes four Dublin universities in its world ranking – the city itself features in its list of ‘best student cit

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Future job prospects

It’s difficult to overestimate the opportunities that Dublin offers new graduates. The world’s largest and most dynamic companies have made a home here, thanks to our business-friendly environment, proximity to Europe, and rich cultural heritage.

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Museums

Dublin's museums are a treasure trove of the city and the country's history.

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Meetups and events

Moving somewhere new can be daunting; spending time-out with other new arrivals who have shared your experience can really help you to settle in. If you want to meet up with your fellow nationals in the city, both Meetup and InterNations run groups that can make that happen. Or try one of Dublin’s many thriving groups for ex-pats from different countries: these include associations for private individuals – like Oi (Brasil) and 

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Move to Dublin: 10 steps

1. Figure out the entry requirements Firstly, you need to check if you need a visa (and if so, what type) to gain entry to Ireland. Make sure you tick all the boxes before making your way here. 2. Start the house hunt There’s no getting around the fact that housing is in short supply in Dublin. Booming employment opportunities are attracting many domestic and international newcomers to the city – and they all need somewhere to live.

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Bringing your pet

There are a number of different factors to consider when planning to bring your pet to Ireland: 1. Your country of origin EU countries Pet dogs, cats and ferrets from EU member states can travel freely within other EU member states, once they have an up-to-date EU Pet Passport. If bringing more than five animals, you must have a veterinary cert to prove that each has been examined within the previous 48 hours. Non-EU countries Cats, dogs and ferrets from outside EU member s

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Driving licence & cars

Getting on the road in Ireland is relatively straightforward. You will, of course, need a driver’s licence. The National Driver Licence Service is responsible for licencing drivers in Ireland. If you’ve got a vehicle, you’ll need to make sure that it’s taxed and insured. What’s involved? Do I need to get an Irish driver’s licence? EU & EEA Licences Drivers with an EU or EEA member state licence need never change to an Irish licence. If they wish to exchange their licence for an Irish one, they must do so within 10 years

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Invest

With a strong, open economy, strategic location and unrivalled incentives for investment, it’s no wonder that Dublin is consistently ranked as one of the best places in the world for doing business. The opportunities and lifestyle that it provides attracts homegrown and international talent to this diverse and energetic city.

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Official procedures

Dealing with the authorities doesn’t have to be a headache. We’ve drawn together some of the essential things you’ll need to get sorted as you set up in Dublin. Dealing with the council? Here’s our handy guide to the city council’s services. Organising a visa? Here’s advice on the type that you’ll need and for it. Want to get on the road? Here’s the lowdown on getting licensed and making sure your vehicle is road legal.

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Settling in

17% of people currently living in Dublin were born outside of Ireland; as the city’s international population continues to grow, the rich array of activities, cuisines and events on offer has expanded in kind. So whatever your interest, you’re sure to find others to share it with. If you’re missing home, it won’t be difficult to find food, festivals and friends from your own country in Dublin. Rest assured that you’ll be able to practice your religion freely here too. The Pew Research Centre has found that the Republic of

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Exhibitions

Art / Photographic Exhibitions in Dublin An Art and Photographic Exhibitions guide for Dublin. All events may not be listed. For further details please visit the venue website. You can scroll down through the page or jump to a particular venue by clicking on a link below: Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane IMMA – The Irish Museum of Modern Art National Gallery of Ireland National Library of Ireland National Museum of Ireland – Archaeology National Museum of Ireland – Decor

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Walking Tours

Pat Liddy’s Walking Tours of Dublin When you take a tour with an award-winning company, you know you’re in pretty safe hands. But Pat Liddy isn’t just the safe bet: his love of Dublin is so infectious that you’ll find you’re learning about the city while feeling like you’re chatting with an enthusiastic friend. His team is just as Dublin-mad as Liddy himself, so get your questions ready! There’s a variety of themed walks on offer, covering everything from highlights and hidden gems to St Patrick and Jonathan Swift.

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Dublin City Council Events

The Dublin City Council events team work to ensure that events delivered in Dublin City offer variety, deliver on fun and excitement and provide opportunities for everyone to enjoy and experience the City in a family-friendly inclusive and safe environment. We aim to promote the use of public spaces through our year-round programme of festivals and events that bring social, cultural and economic benefits to the city and help to grow tourist and local visitor numbers. We liaise directly with event organisers and event management companies to assist them with the delivery of safe, properly planned and managed events.

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Parks & Gardens

Dublin city is no concrete jungle: it’s dotted with open spaces where you can stretch your legs, get some fresh air and soak up nature. First among them is Phoenix Park, one of the largest urban parks in Europe and unique in Dublin. It’s home to a beautiful array of local flora and fauna, as well as historic built heritage: nestled within the park is Áras an Uachtaráin, the home of the president of Ireland; as well as Farmleigh, past home of the Guinness family; medieval

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Markets

Everything you need to know about Dublin's markets. If you want an authentic taste of the originality, creativity and variety on offer in Dublin, you've got to make a trip to one of its markets. They take place across the city and throughout the year, so there's bound to be at least one on when you visit.

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Galleries

Dublin is graced with a wide variety of galleries and most of them are free entry!

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Festivals

Dublin's festivals are many and varied, spanning every season and a broad range of interests. Some of the biggest are ones you might guess; but there's a whole host of more unusual – and no less enjoyable! – festivals on offer, just waiting to be joined.

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Attractions

The Big Hitters Dublin’s rich mix of history, culture and nature ensures that visitors will never run out of interesting places to visit. Best of all, many of these – including world-class galleries parks and museums – do not charge an entry fee (or even one of those ‘suggested donation’ schemes). Enjoy! The Book of Kells at Trinity College One of the world’s most famous books, the Book of Kells is a 9th-century copy of the Gospels. Spectacularly ornate, completely unique and impeccably preserved, it is housed in Dublin’s historic Trinity College Library

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Things to do

It’s impossible to be bored in Dublin – no matter how you like to spend your free time. Whether you’re a history nut, an art aficionado, a sports fiend or a night owl, this city has the museums, mountains, galleries, markets, nightlife and more to keep you entertained.

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Soccer

Whilst Gaelic games might be the most watched sports in the country, more Irish people play soccer (commonly referred to as football) than any other sport. The Football Association of Ireland (FAI) are the governing body and oversee domestic leagues and national teams. Football is especially popular in urban areas and in 2017/2018 the Leinster Senior League (LSL) for adults operated 21 divisions. The Dublin and District Schoolboys League (DDSL), founded in 1943, is affiliated with more than 200 clubs and operates divisions from boys and girls under 7 right up to under 18s.

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Rugby

Mighty Aviva Stadium, the home of Irish rugby, rises from the red brick terrace houses of Beggar’s Bush on the banks of the River Dodder. Rugby has been played here since 1872 when Henry Dunlop and the Irish Champion Athletics Club laid out sports grounds here. The first representative match was played between Leinster and Ulster in 1876 and Ireland’s first international fixture against England in 1878 – making it the world’s oldest rugby union test venue. It is now home to the Irish Rugby Football Union (IRFU), the body that manages rugby union in both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

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Gaelic Games

Gaelic games, as the name suggests, are games unique to Ireland. The two primary men’s Gaelic games are football and hurling under the auspices of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA). Women play ladies’ Gaelic football under the Ladies’ Gaelic Football Association (LGFA) and camogie (almost identical to hurling) under The Camogie Association. The GAA, the largest sporting organisation in the country, was established in 1884. Croke Park on Dublin’s north side is its headquarte

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Sports

The Irish are mad about sports and Dubliners are no different. The three most popular sports in Ireland, by attendance at senior games, are Gaelic games (Gaelic football and hurling), soccer (commonly referred to as ‘football’) and rugby. But a huge variety of other sports are also played across the county and country. Sports clubs tend to be very community-orientated and are a great way of meeting like-minded people, either as an individual or as a family. Whether your children participate in sport, you take part yourself or you volunteer to help out, getting involved with your local club will really help you settle-in to Dublin. We’ve listed the most popular sports a

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Study

Dublin is the vibrant and exciting capital of Ireland. With all the amenities and activities a student could wish for – plus a fantastic location – it’s the perfect place to study. Approximately 25,000 students from outside Ireland attend publicly-funded colleges annually and this figure is likely to rise. Meanwhile more than 100,000 students a year come to Dublin to learn English at the city’s many English-language schools.

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Work

Global companies continue to base their European HQs here and the local start-up scene is buzzing. So here is everything you need to know about working in Dublin. The city is going from strength to strength – and your career here could be doing the same.

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