You work to live; you don’t live to work! There’s a lot more to life in Dublin than the 9 to 5 – so what’s it like to set up home here?

Accommodation

Accommodation is available in Dublin but it is not abundant and this is reflected in prices. Excellent employment opportunities, a booming multinational sector and a high density of third-level educational institutions have driven the demand for housing high. Renting The government has responded to this pressure by introducing a 4% yearly cap on rent increases, preventing landlords from upping rent by more than this figure per annum. Although Dublin is still the most expensive county in which to live, a well-connected transport network means that l

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Cost of living

Dublin is not a cheap place to live. The Economist Intelligence Unit Cost of Living Report ranks it as the 19th most expensive of 133 cities. On the plus side, this ranking does indicate that Dublin is less expensive than Paris, Zurich, Geneva, Copenhagen, Helsinki, Tel Aviv and Frankfurt as well as New York and LA in the USA and Singapore, Osaka, Seoul, Hong Kong, Tokyo and Sydney in the Asia-Pacific region. Consumer goods The price of consumer goods is quite high compared to other European cities, although this is coming down. Ongoing competition between supermarket chains ha

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Waste & recycling

The average person in Ireland threw away 322kg of household waste in 2012, the last year the Environmental Protection Agency compiled its National Waste Report. Kerbside Collection Most of this waste is collected at the roadside – known as ‘kerbside collection’. Four companies offer kerbside bin collection in Dublin: Greyhound Recycling and Recovery Thorntons

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Utilities & maintenance

Whether renting or purchasing your own home, it’s important to know how to set up utilities and maintain your property. Renters should be aware that the relationship between a tenant and their landlord differs from country to country. How do things stand in Dublin? Utilities As a tenant or owner occupier, you are responsible for setting up your home’s utilities in your own name. If you are renting, make sure at the beginning of your rental contract sure that your landlord informs you of which companies supply your gas, water and electricity, so that you can contact them and take over the accounts. Electricity and gas Ireland has deregulated e

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Bank & credit union accounts

Opening a bank account You will need to open an Irish bank account, if only to receive your salary – most Irish employers will not deposit your pay into a foreign account. There are two ways to do this – in person or online. Either way, you won’t be able to do this before you arrive in Ireland. Due to anti-money laundering legislation, most Irish banks will want to meet you in person before opening an account for you. The bigger retail banks in Ireland are: Allied Irish Banks (AIB)

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Healthcare & insurance

Ireland’s healthcare system is divided into public and private tiers. Public Ireland’s public healthcare system offers world-class care, partly funded by the government. If you are “ordinarily resident”, you can access a range of public health services that are free of charge or subsidised by the Irish government’s Health Service Executive (HSE). (You are considered to be “ordinarily resident” if you have been living in Ireland for at least one year – or you intend to live in the country for at least one year.) Holders of a European Health Insurance

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Families & children

Dublin is a great place to raise a family. As well as an excellent education system, your children will be able to enjoy the city’s beautiful parks, open spaces and nearby beaches and mountains, all while growing up in a safe and richly cultured society. Childcare There are many options for childcare in Dublin. Childminders are self-employed individuals who look after children in their home. Nurseries and creches offer a more formal environment, with set nap and meal times. Playschools and Montessori schools offer informal learning environments that prepare children for primary school. You might also consider engaging a professional nanny or au pair, although this te

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Schools & education

The OECD’s Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) takes a survey of the world’s education systems every three years. Over half a million 15-year-old students in 72 countries and territories take part in an internationally-agreed two-hour test that measures their attainment in science, maths, reading, collaborative problem solving and financial literacy. Ireland consistently excels in these tests. The most recent results indicate that Irish students perform better than the OECD average in science, maths and reading. Interestingly, immigrant students in Ireland p

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Safety & security

Ireland is a generally safe country. The 2018 Peace Index ranks it as the tenth-safest country in the world, just behind Japan. A 2017 Fáilte Ireland survey found that 97% of tourist felt safe and secure on their visit to Ireland. Those staying longer-term can expect to feel safe, too. Ireland’s crime rate is low by global standards

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Emergencies & helplines

If you need emergency services, including the Police (An Garda Síochana or ‘the Gardai’), Fire Brigade, or Ambulance call 112 or 999. When to call Call 112 or 999 in genuine emergencies – when someone’s life, health, property, or the environment is in danger. Don’t expect someone else to call – do it yourself. Make sure that your kids know how to call the emergency number, and what to say when they get through. On the call You’ll be asked which emergency service you need – the Gardaí, the ambulance or the fire brigade. If you’re not sure, the operator will ask you about the

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