Compact and easy to navigate; mild no matter the season; filled with history, energy and opportunity: there are a lot of reasons Dubliners love the Fair City. But if there’s one reason to move here, it has to be the people – we’re some of the friendliest in the world!

History & Society

Dublin’s legacy stretches back over a millennium of history, change and development. The first known settlement here was Áth Cliath, which took its name from a major ford across the tidal River Liffey. Around the sixth century, a monastery named Duiblinn (Irish for ‘blackpool’) was founded here, where Vikings eventually arrived. After the Anglo-Norman invasion in 1170, Dublin became the capital of the English Lordship of Ireland and was populated extensively with settlers from England and Wales. The early 16th century was a turbulent time when King Henry VIII’s split with the church led to the closure of monasteries and the destruction of religious institutions with

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People & Culture

Dublin-born icon, Oscar Wilde wrote, "It is absurd to divide people into good and bad. People are either charming or tedious!" If there's one thing that's central to Dubliners, it's the dry wit you'll find here; the tongue-in-cheek, good-hearted humour that makes teasing just as much a sign of the welcome as it is part of the vernacular. The biggest draw to Dublin has to be its people. They’re the reason the city was recently voted in the top 10 friendliest cities in the world; why it has the greatest nightlife; why its art and culture is some of the most influential and vibrant to be found anywhere.

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Practical information

Often, it’s only when you arrive in a place that you realise all the questions you never thought to ask yourself before you set off on your journey. We’ve rounded up some facts about life in Dublin that you might not even know you’ll need to know! What’s the weather like? Ireland’s climate could be described as mild, moist and changeable. Dublin gets about 730mm (28 inches) of rain a year – more than London or Paris, less than Copenhagen or Munich. In the height of summer, the sun doesn’t set until almost 10pm. Temperatures rarely drop below freezing and snow is uncommon except on high ground. The mercury tops out at about 20° Celsius in summ

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Getting to and from Dublin

Dublin is closely connected to the rest of Europe by air and sea – and to the rest of the island of Ireland by road and rail. By air Dublin’s airport is one of the top 20 in Europe for both direct and hub connectivity. It connects the city to over 180 destinations in 42 countries across four continents. The airport, which is north of the city, is easily accessible by road from the city centre (25-35 mins). Aircoach is a private bus service from the airport to the city centre and destinations in the south of the county. 

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Getting Around

There are plenty of options for getting from A to B in Dublin. This is a fairly compact city, which means walking and cycling are viable options for getting around; you can walk from many of the city’s outlying districts to its centre in 30 or 40 minutes. Bus Dublin Bus connects most parts of the city through a network of 200 routes that service 5,000 stops, with new services being added as the city grows. Go-Ahead Dublin, the newest bus company in Dublin, operates a fleet of

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County areas

Dublin city stretches across 115km², with the county itself covering 921km². While it’s not the biggest area, as Ireland’s capital city, it has a lot going on – which is why it’s split into four local authorities: Dublin City Council, Fingal County Council, South Dublin County Council and Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council.

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City neighbourhoods

Dublin is a city bisected by the River Liffey. People tend to divide it into two key areas: the north side – traditionally home to a working class resident – and the south side, home to the middle and upper classes. That distinction is being quickly eroded, however, as a number of neighbourhoods in the north, such as Smithfield, Stoneybatter and Clontarf become gentrified. The core of the inner city is contained within two canals: the Royal to the north and the Grand to the south. Over 550,000 people live in these 115 square kilometres. Certain areas are still referred to by their old postal district numbers (like Dublin 8 and Dublin 4). The following areas are just a s

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